Reel Opportunities

Gaffer

Also known as: Chief Electrician, Supervising or Chief Lighting Technician

What is a Gaffer?
What does a Gaffer do?

Gaffers work closely with the Director of Photography (DoP) to bring to life the overall look of a film by creating and controlling light.

They work with the DoP to understand the desired light effects and figure out how to achieve them. They go on location scouts to see how the lighting will work on location and draw up a list of the equipment that will be needed to achieve the artistic vision.

Then they pitch for the equipment. They put in a request to the Line Producer or Production Manager for the equipment they need and appoint the Best Person to hire the crew and order the gear. During filming, they work out the positioning of the lights and the fastest way to change the lighting setups between shots. Gaffers mediate between the DoP and the rest of the lighting crew.

They’re also responsible for safety and need to comply with the scientific theory of electricity, driving, and employment.

What's a Gaffer good at?
  • Understanding light

    Have an artistic eye, know the techniques required to achieve different lighting effects and the kit needed to achieve them

  • Electrical knowledge

    Have an in-depth understanding of circuits, power supplies, motors, cables, fuses, thermal relays, fault current protection switches, heating, lighting, air conditioning and more

  • Knowledge of film-making

    Be able to understand the production process, particularly the roles of the director of photography and how the gaffer role fits in

  • Communication

    Be able to draw up plans and explain them to the crew, communicate well with the director of photography and the lighting crew, be clear and approachable even when making quick decisions under pressure

  • Organization

    Work within a budget, schedule the crew and the kit requirements, prioritize and meet deadlines

  • Working at heights

    Be good at climbing ladders as most lights are set up above the head height

Who does a Gaffer work with?

The Gaffer oversees the lighting department and works closely with the Best Person who is mainly responsible for getting the right lights to the right places at the right times, the Lighting Technician who sets up the lighting equipment and manages the gear, and the Generator Operator who load and transport the generators required for productions. The Gaffer also works closely with the Director of Photography (DoP) to configure the layout and positioning of the lighting to best achieve the DoP’s vision.

How do I become a Gaffer?

Gaffers should be fully qualified Electricians, so your first step is to get yourself qualified and experienced in electrical installation. Then you need to develop contacts in the film and TV drama industry to get experience working on film sets. Look at the electrical trainee job profile to learn more about how to do this. Once you have found your way into the lighting team, you need to work your way through the roles outlined above.

Work with a kit hire company: Get work experience with a kit rental company. Look for companies that supply equipment to the theater, film, TV, and events industries. Get to know the best persons coming in and ask if they would take you on as a trainee.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Professional Organizations Associated With This Role

Each region of Canada has different professional organizations associated with jobs in films and television. Select your region for more information.

This position is represented by the following unions/guilds in your selected region.

Sorry, we couldn’t find a professional organization associated with this role in the region you selected.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

3rd Assistant Director (3rd AD)

Also known as: Thirds

What does a 3rd Assistant Director (3rd AD) do?

Thirds are the 1st AD’s right-hand on set. They are responsible for coordinating extras, preparing and cueing them, as well as sometimes directing them in any required background action. They may have to keep members of the public out of shot, or off the set and/or the location, and will liaise with the Location Manager regarding the security and tidying up of studios and locations after filming.

The 3rd AD reports directly to the 2nd AD. The 3rd AD’s key responsibilities include moving actors from point A to point B, organizing extras, and supervising Production Assistants. The individual may also serve as the set messenger, conveying information between cast and crew members – usually by radio.

Because the responsibilities of 2nd and 3rd AD overlap, the specific function on-set may vary from film to film. However, it will most likely include things like keeping the public out of the Director’s shots so that they don’t disrupt the expensive production schedule, locking up a studio, and securing a location when filming is completed. There may even be some directing involved – cueing extras and drivers of on-set vehicles and generally coordinating the background action.

What’s a 3rd Assistant Director (3rd AD) good at?
  • Multi-tasking

    Pay close attention to what is happening in one shot while getting ready for the next one

  • Attention to detail

    Ensure everything is on screen as it should be - cueing extras and even directing

  • Communication

    Able to let a wide range of people know exactly what is required of them and get them to work together, ability to listen to the director

  • Organization

    Plan, multi-task, work calmly under pressure

Who does a 3rd Assistant Director (3rd AD) work with?

The 3rd AD reports directly to the 2nd AD and on set works closely with the 1st AD.

How do I become a 3rd Assistant Director (3rd AD)?

Like many roles in film and TV, there are many routes to becoming a 3rd AD. From getting degrees, diplomas, certificates, internships, apprenticeships, or even freelancing and volunteer work, there is no standard recipe. Training on-set is also a great route, and there are lots of ways to do it, both extended and short-term.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

2nd Assistant Director (2nd AD)

What is a 2nd Assistant Director (2nd AD)?
What does a 2nd Assistant Director (2nd AD) do?

The 2nd Assistant Director is the right-hand man of the First Assistant Director (1st AD). The main responsibility of the 2nd AD is to ensure that all of the 1st AD’s orders and directions are followed. Under the supervision of the 1st, the 2nd AD’s prepare and draw up the ‘call sheet,’ which is the document that details daily filming logistics and is distributed to all cast and crew; they supervise all cast movements, ensuring that the principal actors are in makeup, wardrobe, or standing by on the set at the appropriate times.

The 2nd AD may also be in charge of finding and looking after background artists (extras) on smaller productions without a Third Assistant Director. The majority of 2nd ADs also assist the 1st AD in liaising between the set or location and the production office, keeping key personnel up to date on the shoot’s timings and progress.

The film’s 2nd Assistant Director reports directly to the 1st Assistant Director. The 2nd AD will typically use a headset and/or walkie-talkie to communicate with the film’s 1st Assistant Director at all times.

What’s a 2nd Assistant Director (2nd AD) good at?
  • Planning

    Co-ordinate the schedules of various departments including camera, make-up, hair, costume, design, and visual effects, think ahead and create call-sheets

  • Time-management

    Coordinate logistics, make arrangements, and draw up detailed plans for the 1st AD's review

  • Innovation

    Think of creative solutions under pressure when the unexpected happens

  • Communication

    Able to let a wide range of people know exactly what is required of them and get them to work together, ability to listen to the director

Who does a 2nd Assistant Director (2nd AD) work with?

The 2nd Assistant Director works directly with the 1st Assistant Director. They also manage the movements of the actors and work closely with the hair/makeup and wardrobe departments.

How do I become a 2nd Assistant Director (2nd AD)?

Like many roles in film and TV, there are many routes to becoming a 2nd Assistant Director. From getting degrees, diplomas, certificates, internships, apprenticeships, or even freelancing and volunteer work, there is no standard recipe. Training on-set is also a great route, and there are lots of ways to do it, both extended and short-term.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Production Assistant

Also known as: PA

What does a Production Assistant do?

The PA does just about anything and everything, from getting coffee to making script copies to shuttling crew or equipment around town as necessary. How much a Production Assistant does depends on the budget of the production, as well as how much confidence their superiors have in their abilities. They get tasked with doing many of the small jobs – such as copying call sheets & scripts, taking breakfast orders – and go around distributing these items to the crew. This allows them to learn about various aspects of the production. They can also do general office jobs like answering the phone, filing paperwork and entering data. They manage a float, buy stationery and keep everyone stocked up with caffeine and snacks. PA’s are usually freelancers.

Starting out as a PA is a great way to get to know what life on set is like and figure out what career path you may want to choose within the film world. Most departments on set, such as Art or Locations, have their own Production Assistants that are given tasks specific to that department. Depending on the production, there may be more than one type of Production Assistant on a film or television set such as ones that work on set (Set PA), or after everything has been shot (Post-production PA).

What’s a Production Assistant good at?
  • Taking instruction

    Listen carefully, do what’s asked quickly, stay calm under pressure

  • Taking initiative

    Have common sense, see what needs to be done in a situation, work without supervision

  • Multi-tasking

    Be able to be organized and prioritize when asked to do different things by different people at the same time

  • Watching film and TV drama

    Have a passion for the genre and a love of the industry

  • Learning by watching and asking

    Observe what’s happening and know when to ask about things you don’t understand

  • Reliability

    Get to set on time, be punctual

  • Communication

    Give clear and concise communication, learn the faces and names of all the senior crew members to excel in this position

  • Some items you might find helpful to take with you as part of your PA kit on set (especially on your first day) are

    Pen or Sharpie for taking notes & food or drink orders
    Flashlight for early morning or late night shifts
    Phone Charger
    Phone with map reading software
    Car mount for phone; it’s not essential but it’s very useful

Who does a Production Assistant work with?

Production Assistants work with almost everyone on the production team and crew. They are directly supervised by department heads and senior management such as the Production Manager. On a daily basis PAs interact with everyone involved. Being a PA is a great way to meet and network with crew members in the career path you are interested in.

How do I become a Production Assistant?

Educational Requirements: You might find courses in art and design, photography, drama and theatre, physics, psychology, English, graphic communication or business useful.

Make films: Learn how films are made by making films. This will help you learn the craft of film production and demonstrate your interest.

Learn to drive: It helps to get to film locations early in the morning and in out-of-the-way places.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Prop Master

Also known as: Property Master, Prop Person

What does a Prop Master do?

A prop is any moveable item that can be seen on a film. It could be a hat, gun, cushion, wine glass, lightsaber, carpet, kitchen unit, tree or aircraft. Prop Masters run the property department which makes, stores and transports the props as well as preps the props for each day’s shoot.

Prop Masters usually start work a few weeks before shooting begins. They work with Production Designer, Set Decorators and Art Director to work out what props are needed. They do research and then draw up properties lists, deciding which are to be hired and which are to be made. They create a ‘set and strike’ schedule to share with location and construction departments.

Where props are to be made, Prop Masters recruit the Carpenters and prop makers and manage the schedule for production. Where they are hired, they work with the Production Buyers to source them.

When shooting is finished, they return all hired props and organize the sale or safe disposal of everything else.

What's a Prop Master good at?
  • Understanding film

    Pick up the Director’s vision, break a script down for props requirements take account of the need for continuity

  • Historical knowledge

    Research different eras, dress a set authentically

  • Craftsmanship

    Work with a wide variety of materials, craft and repair items

  • Moving items

    Handle large, heavy but fragile items

  • Communication

    Work closely with the Production Designer and other departments, share the vision with the props team

  • Organization

    Manage staff, budgets, complex schedules, transport and storage

Who does a Prop Master work with?

Prop Masters report to Production Designer and Set Decorators as part of the art department. They work closely with the Director, Art Director, Production Buyers, Location Manager and Construction Manager. They also might work with the Script Supervisor to maintain set continuity (keeping track of whether a glass is full or empty, where a particular item is placed at the start or end of a take, how objects move, and so on).

How do I become a Prop Master?

This is a senior level role, so college-level technical education in art and design, along with several years of experience in the art department, are required. Apprenticeships or on the job training are also possible. This position requires the ability to work well with your hands and construct materials to form props when needed, as well as organizational skills and an interest in the historical accuracy of items and scenes on a film set.

Here are some more tips:

Learn how to drive a van or a truck: Being a Prop Master can often involve moving heavy props and travelling around different locations. Learning to drive is essential for this, as is learning how to move large, heavy but fragile items safely.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

1st Assistant Director

Also known as: 1st AD, First, First AD, Assistant director, AD

What does a 1st Assistant Director do?

The 1st Assistant Director (AD) is the director’s right hand. They are directly responsible for running the set during production, and most of the main crew report to the 1st AD. 1st ADs plan the filming schedule, working with the Director, Production Manager, Director of Photography and other heads of department to ensure an efficient shoot.

In pre-production, 1st ADs break down the script, analysing it for what will be needed in terms of cast, locations, equipment and crew. Along with the Director, the 1st AD prepares the shooting script which identifies all the specific shots that will be taken during the shoot. Then they input the scripts into computer programs such as Movie Magic software, which helps them work out what to film and when, depending on the availability of cast and locations. They write the shooting schedule and work out how long each scene will take to film. Along with the 2nd AD, the 1st AD helps to prepare the daily “call sheet” and makes sure everyone stays on a schedule in accordance.

On many sets, at crew call, the 1st AD will prepare a safety and logistics meeting with the main crew. During filming 1st ADs manage the set, which leaves the Director free to focus on the actors and framing the shots. A 1st AD must have general knowledge of every department on a production and know how to delegate tasks to each department on behalf of the Director. Another task of the 1st AD during filming is to “call roll” which is when the 1st AD cues the heads of departments to ready themselves for filming. In many cases, the 1st AD may even call “action!” for the Director.

What’s a 1st Assistant Director good at?
  • Visualizing the script

    Read the script and know what this means in terms of cameras, locations and cast, understand the Director’s vision

  • Planning and Organization

    Analyze what is needed for a shoot, and co-ordinate the schedules of various departments including camera, make-up, hair, costume, design and visual effects, think ahead

  • Multi-tasking

    Pay close attention to what is happening in one shot while getting ready for the next one

  • Innovation

    Think of creative solutions under pressure when the unexpected happens

  • Communication

    Able to let a wide range of people know exactly what is required of them and get them to work together, ability to listen to the Director

Who does a 1st Assistant Director work with?

1st Assistant Directors work closely with the Production Manager, who supervises the production expenditures and arrangements as a whole. They also work closely with the 2nd Assistant Director, who is the main off-set contact with other departments and prepares the call sheet, as well as the 3rd Assistant Director, who is the 1st Assistant Director’s right-hand on set.

How do I become a 1st Assistant Director?

This is a senior role that requires many years of experience. Most 1st Assistant Directors start out as PA’s and work their way up. Here are some more tips:

Network online: Create a LinkedIn profile. See if there are Facebook pages or other social media groups for people making films or TV in your area. There might even be groups for Production Assistants and other entry-level roles.. Join them. Find a film office near you and get connected. If you do sign up to paid sites, make sure they specialize in the areas in which you’re interested.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Construction Manager

What does a Construction Manager do?

Construction Managers look after the building of sets in the studio. They make sure the sets look realistic or look the way the production desires. They interpret the drawings of the Production Designer, Art Directors, and Set Designers and work out how to build them in ways that are safe and environmentally friendly.

Then they hire the workforce, the Carpenters, Painters, Riggers, and Plasterers, and ensure everyone knows what needs to be done and by when. They are responsible for getting the necessary materials and tools on-site. They are also responsible for the safety of the crew. Construction Managers are responsible for dismantling (or “striking”) the sets, and ensuring all the materials are recycled as much as possible, or placed into storage for future productions.

What's a Construction Manager good at?
  • Construction

    Know all aspects of building work

  • Reading drawings

    Interpret drawings to plan size and scale, understand the designer’s vision, work out what this means in terms of building requirements

  • Organization

    Manage a budget, work to a schedule, recruit hundreds of constructors within a tight timeframe

  • Communication

    Be able to liaise between the artists and the construction workers, get a team to work well together

  • Staying safe

    Ensure all health and safety measures are in place

Who does a Construction Manager work with?

Charge Artist
Charge Artists or Lead Scenic Artists are responsible for all the work carried out by the painting team.

Scenic Artist
Scenic Artists may be asked to paint cloud or city backdrops, murals or other on-set paintings. They are skilled painters capable of intricate detailing and painting techniques such as marbling, wood graining and ageing. They may create complex prop pieces. They are responsible for scheduling their own work and buying necessary supplies.

Set Painter
Painters may be responsible for a range of artistic effects, from painting cars with a metallic finish, using a spray gun to cover a huge background surface, applying fine specialist finishes such as replica marbling and graining effects to sets, painting pipes to make them look old and rusty, and hanging large wall coverings. They usually supply their own tools and specialised brushes.

Set Carpenter
Carpenters produce a variety of structures, from on-screen props like windows and furniture to replica spacecraft or medieval ships. They also do a great deal of off-screen building to create support structures for the crew. This includes all the wooden structures required by film production, from doors and windows to the raised platforms that may be required by the crew.

Plasterer
Plasterers’ work involves the traditional job of applying wet finishes to walls, ceilings and floors. It also involves fibrous plastering, making moulds and model casts from solid plaster or fibreglass in workshops.

Rigger
Rigging is the fastening or securing of items at height in a safe way. Head Riggers are responsible for the work of the entire rigging department.

Model Maker
Model Makers are responsible for building models and miniatures. They could work with clay, plaster, plastic or metal and a range of techniques. They include polystyrene carvers and sculptors who make lightweight and large sculptures, trees, rocks and other oversized complex items. They may use freehand drawings skills or computer-aided design (CAD) to create designs.

How do I become a Construction Manager?

Construction Managers have years of experience in film and TV drama production. Typically, they start off in one of the trades, usually carpentry, and work their way up.

Get an apprenticeship: An apprenticeship is a job with training, so it’s a great opportunity to learn as you earn. However, it might be worth looking for a job as an apprentice in an industry that uses similar skills, such as being a furniture maker or a painter and decorator outside of film and TV. This could help you develop your craft and give you the skills you need to get into film and TV drama at a later point.

Get to know people in the industry: Once you are qualified and have a couple of years’ experience in your chosen trade, you will be handy for constructing film sets. Try to get to know people in the industry and ask if they need your skills.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Electrician

What does an Electrician do?

Electricians look after all the electrical equipment needed on a film or TV production, with a particular focus on the lighting. They help plan it. They rig it (set it up). They operate it, maintain it, and de-rig. Electricians work directly under the Gaffer and the Best Boy Electrician.

During the planning stage of a programme, Electricians assess the equipment. They set it all up and make sure all electrical equipment is working safely throughout the production. This might involve testing, cleaning and repairing equipment, and writing dimmers and circuit boards.

Electricians that are in charge of the generators that may be needed for location lighting. These Electricians are also called Genny Operators. They also monitor electricity usage during shooting to see if additional power or resources are needed.

What's an Electrician good at?
  • Electrical knowledge

    Have official electrical qualifications and a thorough knowledge and understanding of circuits, power supplies, motors, cables, fuses, thermal relays, fault current protection switches, heating, air conditioning and more.

  • Lighting skills

    A good eye for colour, able to use all lighting equipment and aware of what can and can’t be achieved at different locations.

  • Communication

    Take direction well and work effectively within a team.

  • Health and safety

    Know health and safety issues including legal requirements, have strong attention to detail.

  • Manual dexterity

    Be able to do a physically demanding, hands-on job, sometimes at heights, and work long hours.

Who does an Electrician work with?

Electricians often work under a Gaffer and communicate closely with any other Electricians on the team, as well as Camera Operators and Directors. On large productions with lots of lights and LED video projection, there will be a team of Electricians working under a Gaffer.

How do I become an Electrician?

To be an Electrician on a film or TV production, you need electrical qualifications. You also need to be able to demonstrate creativity and an interest in and understanding of the industry.

Look outside the industry: Electricians are needed across many different industries in industrial, commercial and domestic environments. You can gain experience of working as an Electrician in another industry that you can later transfer to a role in the Canadian film & TV industry.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Locations Assistant

What does a Locations Assistant do?

Locations Assistants help the location manager and unit manager with the day-to-day running of the site. They help with cordoning off areas with location marshals or security guards, and keeping the location clean. 

Locations Assistants also help guide the crew to where to park on location. They also help with paperwork regarding acquiring, and management of all locations. On set, they help set up green rooms, tents and areas for holding the cast and crew.

They make sure the locations vans are stocked with stationery, snacks, flashlights, batteries, traffic cones, signs and all the other things that are needed on a shoot.

When filming has ended, they help pack up and leave the site as it was found. They are often the first on set and last to leave each day.

What's a Locations Assistant good at?
  • Interest in locations

    Have an eye for architecture, knowledge of geography, the ability to research and visualize how a location could be turned into a set

  • Photography

    Take good pictures when researching a location

  • Watching film and TV drama

    Have a passion for movies and a love of the industry

  • Reliability

    Get to set on time and do what is asked, take responsibility

  • Being outside

    Have stamina to work long hours in all weather, enjoy being outdoors

  • Communication

    Able to take direction from the location manager and let other members of the team know what’s happening, talk to extras and everyone from the owners of a stately home to the general public wanting to know what’s filming

Who does a Locations Assistant work with?

A Locations Assistant reports to the Locations Manager and works with everyone in the team. They will also be working with the Locations Scouts in the pre-production phase of the production. They will also work with a number of other cast and crew members on set, while they create green rooms and clean the sets.

How do I become a Locations Assistant?

If you are interested in becoming a Locations Assistant, gain experience in managing or taking care of an operational space. You can apply and reach out to local productions to gain more experience as a trainee in the locations department.

Here are some more tips:

Volunteer: Help at music gigs, live events and festivals. The skills needed to set up a successful experience for hundreds of people, troubleshooting, keeping it safe, dealing with the unexpected, are very similar to those needed to work in locations.

Take a health and safety course: This can be a valuable skill on set, especially when working with equipment and vehicles. Taking a course in health and safety can set you apart from other candidates.

Learn to drive: If possible, get access to a car, and definitely ensure you are licensed to drive, as this is often an essential part of the work of the locations department. It will make you more versatile and means you can help more.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Locations Scout

What does a Locations Scout do?

The Location Scout is a member of the production crew responsible for finding locations to be used for filming.

Sometimes, films and TV shows are shot on a set . However, films often use real locations to shoot in. They might be tasked with finding the perfect suburban home with a blue door, and then ensuring the residents of that home are willing to have a film crew shooting on their lawn. There are many databases of available locations for them to search online, but one fun part of the job also involves scouting locations by traveling to them to check them out in person.

A Location Scout is someone whose job it is specifically to visit potential locations in order to ensure they have everything the Producer and Director needs – this is a great entry level position within the locations / production department.

What's a Locations Scout good at?
  • Sourcing locations

    Have an eye for architecture, knowledge of landscapes, ability to research and visualize how a location could be turned into a set

  • Interest in photography

    Take good photographs of locations to present to the rest of the production team

  • Law

    Know how to comply with public liability, trespass, public highway and health and safety legislation

  • Negotiation

    Get the best price for the location and facilities

  • Organization

    Plan, budget, attend to detail and spot potential problems in advance

  • Communication

    Work sensitively with location owners, members of the public and production colleagues

  • Cartographer Skills

    Have a good sense of direction and ability to read and mark maps

Who does a Locations Scout work with?

Location Manager
Location Managers manage the shooting location. They make sure everyone in the cast and crew knows how to get there. They negotiate parking, noise reduction, power sources, catering requirements and any official permissions that may be needed with the site’s management or owner. They are responsible for ensuring it’s safe.

How do I become a Locations Scout?

Some key skills to becoming a good Location Scout include the ability to read, logistical and administrative skills, take photos, drive a car and interact with people in a professional manner. While there is no direct educational route to becoming a Location Scout, some have a background in geography, and real estate. Gaining experience on-set as a Production Assistant, and working towards the locations department is an excellent way to get into the field.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Location Manager

What does a Location Manager do?

The location in which a film is set has a huge impact on its look, feel and story. It’s the job of Location Managers to find that place in the physical world and make sure it’s accessible, safe, and not too expensive to hire.

Based on scripts and discussions with the Director, Production Designers, and other department heads, Location Managers start their research. They might be looking for deserts, stately homes, or shady underpasses. They arrange visits to the locations, take photographs, detailed notes, start discussions with the location owners and work out costs. They present their findings to the Director and, once approved, negotiate and confirm contracts with owners.

Once filming has started, Location Managers manage the location. They make sure everyone in the cast and crew knows how to get there. They negotiate parking, noise reduction, power sources, catering requirements, and any official permissions that may be needed with the site’s management or owner. They are responsible for ensuring it’s safe.

After the shoot, they make sure that the location is cleaned and locked up, before returning it to its owners in a satisfactory condition. Any damage must be reported to the production office and any insurance claims dealt with.

What's a Location Manager good at?
  • Sourcing locations

    Have an eye for architecture, knowledge of landscapes, ability to research and visualize how a location could be turned into a set

  • Interest in photography

    Take good photographs of locations to present to the rest of the production team

  • Law

    Know how to comply with public liability, trespass, public highway, and health, and safety legislation

  • Negotiation

    Get the best price for the location and facilities

  • Organization

    Plan, budget, attend to detail, and spot potential problems in advance

  • Communication

    Work sensitively with location owners, members of the public, and production colleagues

  • Not getting lost

    Have a good sense of direction and the ability to read maps

Who does a Location Manager work with?

Assistant Location Manager or Location Scout
Assistant Location Managers must prepare movement orders and assist with scouting or additional locations by researching, photographing, and making appointments to meet with owners and residents. If a location is approved, the Assistant Location Manager organizes technical visits for heads of other departments. During production, they are responsible for writing and distributing letters to local residents informing them about the filming and liaising between the crew and location owners. At the end of each day, they help the unit manager to clear and tidy the location and set.

Location Production Assistant
Location trainees or locations production assistants assist the locations manager and assistant locations manager on set.

How do I become a Location Manager?

Some key skills to becoming a good Location Manager include the ability to read, understand and draft contracts, logistical and administrative skills, take photos, drive a car, and interact with people in a professional manner. While there is no direct educational route to become a Location Manager, some have a background in geography, real estate. Gaining experience on-set as a Locations PA, and working towards the locations department is an excellent way to get into the field.

Here are some tips:

Take a health and safety course: This can be a valuable skill on set, especially when working with equipment and vehicles. Taking a course in health and safety can set you apart from other candidates.

Learn to drive: If possible, get access to a car. This makes you more versatile and means you can help more.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Foley Artist

What does a Foley Artist do?

Foley Artists come up with creative ways to reproduce sounds to match the visual scene in a film. Foley is the reproduction of everyday sounds, which are then added to films during post-production. It can be challenging to record every small sound that happens in a scene while you’re actually on set (keys rattling in a door, footsteps, a spoon clinking inside a cup, someone typing on their keyboard, etc). Sometimes, these sounds have to be recreated or included after the fact. For example, when actors do a fight scene, they aren’t really hitting each other, so there are no punching sounds to record! The job of a Foley Artist is to find something that can sound convincingly like a real fight to the audience (while avoiding real violence, of course!)

What's a Foley Artist good at?
  • Creativity & Storytelling

    Be able to recreate everyday sounds to enhance the storytelling

  • Using software

    Record sound, have extensive knowledge of ProTools and other audio design software

  • Communication

    Understand the Director’s vision and be able to articulate creative and technical ideas, have productive discussions and address constructive feedback, work closely with the dialogues and always keep the sound in mind

  • Organization

    Be able to work to tight deadlines in post-production

Who does a Foley Artist work with?

Foley Artists work closely with the Director and Editor. They might also work with the following people:

Sound Editor
Sound Editors work directly with the filmmakers to structure and advise on schedules and creative styles. They liaise closely with the picture Editor. They build the team of editors responsible for creating the film’s soundtrack. Sound Editors organize the effects (FX) and Foley recording sessions. They provide creative input during the mix and ensure the final mix and various versions are delivered.

Sound Effects Editor
Sound Effects Editors work closely with the Sound Designer and supervisor. They create backgrounds using specific sounds, such as clocks, wind, birdsong, and cars passing. They create an ambience that can be altered to work with the dialogue and music.

Sound Designer
Sound Designers combine all the elements (music, background noises, dialogue, effects, and other atmospheric sounds) into one unified soundscape that forms the sonic backdrop for a film.

How do I become a Foley Artist?

Foley Artists typically have a college education with a diploma in sound and/or recording arts plus knowledge and experience in post-production. A good place to start is as an intern or runner in a post-production audio facility. This gives you a thorough grounding in the technical aspects of recording sound, including knowledge of electronics and training in acoustics.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Boom Operator

What is a Boom Operator?
What does a Boom Operator do?

A Boom Operator’s primary responsibility is to capture sound on a film or TV production through the use of a microphone on a long pole or arm called a boom pole. The Boom Operator stands beside the Camera Operator and holds the boom pole above the heads of the performers keeping the pole and its shadow out of the shot. In a moving shot, the Boom Operator must follow the action while remaining unseen.

On larger productions, the Boom Operators’ sole job is to hold the boom pole. They report directly to the Sound Recordist or Sound Mixer. On smaller productions, the Boom Operator may also be responsible for affixing body mics known as ‘lavs’ or placing other mics throughout the location. In these cases, the Boom Operator and the Sound Mixer may be one and the same.

What's a Boom Operator good at?
  • Communication

    Have great people skills, put cast members at ease when fitting personal mics and be able to collaborate effectively with other team members to ensure the sound fits with the visuals.

  • Problem-solving

    Be resourceful and find effective solutions to technical problems and recording challenges.

  • Technical knowledge

    Be able to operate, maintain and repair sound equipment, keep up-to-date and use innovations.

  • Knowledge of the production and post-production process

    Have a good understanding of all crew roles and aspects of how a programme is made from pre- through to post-production.

  • Physical fitness

    The film industry is characterized by very long filming days, which means that boom operators often have to hold up the boom mic consistently throughout an entire day—for many days in a row. This can cause a lot of strain on your arms, shoulders, and back.

Who does a Boom Operator work with?

Boom Operators work intimately with all on-screen talent and contributors, fitting personal mics and monitoring their sound output. They communicate with all members of the production and crew, especially Camera Operators and Directors. The Boom Operator reports to the Production Sound Mixer, the senior-most sound crew member on set. On lower-budget films, the Boom Operator and the production’s Sound Mixer are often just one person, referred to as the “Sound Recordist.”

How do I become a Boom Operator?

Though there is no formal requirement, the basic skills common to all successful Boom Operators include cursory knowledge of electronics and sound recording equipment, excellent aural skills, strength and dexterity, memorization skills, good timing, attention to detail, and the ability to work in teams.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Stunt Performer

What does a Stunt Performer do?

A Stunt Performer is a trained professional who performs stunts. “Stunts” encompass a wide variety of actions that might need to be performed on set. When there is a high-speed car chase or fight sequence on screen, those actions are performed by stunt people. Sometimes, even much smaller and less dangerous actions (such as bumping into something and falling down) might be performed by a stunt person. Some stunt people act as “doubles” for specific actors, doing all the action sequences instead of them. Many stunt sequences are very tightly scripted and planned, so Stunt Performers need to be physically fit, and often need to be trained in some form of martial arts, gymnastics, or combat discipline.

Please remember, in spite of their well-choreographed appearance, stunts can still be dangerous and physically demanding!

What's a Stunt Performer good at?
  • Physical Fitness

    Physically fit and is knowledgeable in physical fitness, is aware of the intricate movements of the human body, some skills in martial arts or gymnastics

  • Flexibility

    Thrive in changing situations, enjoy spontaneity

  • Physical Attributes

    Good Eyesight, quick reflexes, and flexibility (Body), good sense of timing

  • Strong Mental State

    Able to cope with the physical demands of the job and the risk of danger

Who does a Stunt Performer work with?

Stunt Performers will work closely with the Stunt Coordinator and the Fight Choreographer if the stunts include fight sequences. They work with the Stunt Coordinators to rehearse and learn the choreography of the stunts beforehand and learn the safety measures in place. Stunt Performers will also work closely with the onset crew such as grips, to make sure everything is in place for the stunts on the day of. They would also work with the actor, if they are a double for a main actor, to gain their movements and mannerisms to make the scene believable.

How do I become a Stunt Performer?

Stunt Performers should be physically active and be trained in some form of martial arts, gymnastics, or combat discipline. You have good reflexes, flexibility, and overall athletic ability. Stunt Performers perform dangerous acts so you must have a good understanding of basic health and safety training as well as not have a fear for dangerous acts.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Animal Wrangler

What does an Animal Wrangler do?

Animal Wranglers manage any animal that appears on camera and gets them to perform whatever action is required by the script or the director. Off set, they care for and train the animals.

Trainers provide appropriate physical and mental exercises to keep animals healthy and happy during the hours they are not working on set. Additional duties for movie animal trainers may include providing food and water, administering medications and supplements, maintaining cages and enclosures, exercising animals, keeping accurate health and behaviour records, and transporting the animals to and from the set/location.

They must train the animals to perform certain tasks while filming and handle them in between scenes. If the animal is dangerous, they must ensure that proper safety is in place to best deal with the animal.

Learn More

What's an Animal Wrangler good at?
  • Animal Knowledge

    Have knowledge of animals and the behavior of animals, especially the animals they are specifically working with

  • Passion for Animals

    Have a love for animals and working with animals

  • Attentiveness

    Being able to look after the animals for long periods of time and stay on top of their needs

  • Animal Training

    Know how to train animals and direct the animals to do certain tasks needed during filming

  • Flexibility

    Thrive in changing situations, and enjoy spontaneity

  • Organization

    Being able to organize the arriving, storing, feeding, and care for the animals on set.

Who does an Animal Wrangler work with?

Animal Wranglers will work with the Director to discover what will be required of the animals. They will work with the Director to get the intended action of the animal required in the scene. They will work with the Producer and Production Coordinator to work out the logistics of the animals’ on set and the storing of the animals. They will also work closely with other crew members on set and other animal trainers while the animals are performing

How do I become an Animal Wrangler?

There is no single route to becoming an Animal Wrangler, but love and respect for animals are required. You have to know how to train and properly handle various animals for the safety of yourself and crew members but also the safety of the animal.

Educational requirements: Although a college degree is not mandatory to enter the field, common college majors for aspiring animal trainers include animal science, animal behavior, biology, zoology, marine biology, and psychology. Most movie animal trainers have a degree in an animal-related field or significant practical experience gained by interning with experienced trainers, gaining valuable hands-on experience along the way.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Fight Choreographer

What does a Fight Choreographer do?

Fight Choreographers design and direct combat sequences for film and TV. Much like dance choreographers, they instruct actors on how to move in various ways, in order to make fight scenes appear realistic and/or historically accurate, while also ensuring the safety of the cast and crew. While knowledge of various fighting styles is necessary for this career, Fight Choreographers must also understand theatrical staging and the principles of choreography. Before choreographing fights, individuals must first be trained in how to fight in particular styles, such as hand-to-hand combat, fencing, and martial arts.

What's a Fight Choreographer good at?
  • Physical Fitness

    They are physically fit and are knowledgeable in physical fitness, are aware of the intricate movements of the human body, and have some skills in martial arts or gymnastic

  • Flexibility

    Thrive in changing situations, enjoy spontaneity

  • Choreography

    Able to plan out large fight and stunt sequences

  • Physical Attributes

    Good Eyesight, quick reflexes, and flexibility, good sense of timing

  • Organizing

    Need to have the skill to organize the stunt crew, paperwork, and plans for each scene

Who does a Fight Choreographer work with?

Fight Choreographers will work with the director and the actors to gain an idea of what a fight scene should entail. They will also work with stunt performers when the actors are unable to perform the fight sequences or part of the fight sequences. They will teach the Stunt Performers and actors the moves of the fight. They will also work with the Stunt Coordinator to go over the specific stunts performed in the fight.

How do I become a Fight Choreographer?

Fight Choreographers should be physically active and be trained in some form of martial arts, gymnastics, or combat discipline. Many Fight Choreographers start out as Stunt Performers before they can take on the role of Fight Choreographers. Fight Choreographers may also find it useful to choreograph a dance or large-scale theater productions, to gain knowledge of planning and working with a large number of people.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Stunt Coordinator

What is a Stunt Coordinator?
What does a Stunt Coordinator do?

A Stunt Coordinator is in charge of coordinating and arranging the stunts for a film or TV show and hiring the Stunt Performers to do them. In many cases, the Stunt Coordinator budgets, designs, and choreographs the stunt sequences to suit the script and the Director’s vision. They are usually an experienced Stunt Performer.

Many stunts performed by Stunt Performers are very dangerous and the Stunt Coordinator is in charge of making sure safety measures are in place. They will collaborate with the cast and crew to create the best possible way to execute the stunts that are required in the film.

What's a Stunt Coordinator good at?
  • Physical Fitness

    Physically fit, is aware of the intricate movements of the human body, some skills in martial arts or gymnastics

  • Choreography

    Able to plan out large fight and stunt sequences

  • Organizing

    Need to have the skill to organize the stunt crew, paperwork, and plans for each scene

  • Flexibility

    Thrive in changing situations, and enjoy spontaneity

  • Physical Attributes

    Good Eyesight, quick reflexes, flexibility (Body), and a good sense of timing

Who does a Stunt Coordinator work with?

Stunt Coordinators work with the Director and the Producer to get the feel of the film and to identify the planned stunts. They work with the Stunt Performers to rehearse the choreography of the stunts beforehand while having safety measures in place. Stunt Coordinators will also work closely with the onset crew such as Grips, to make sure everything is in place for the stunts.

How do I become a Stunt Coordinator?

Many Stunt Coordinators start out as Stunt Performers before they can take on the role of Stunt Coordinator. Stunt Coordinators should be physically active and be trained in some form of martial arts, gymnastics, or combat discipline. Stunt Coordinators may also find it useful to choreograph a dance or large-scale theatre productions, to gain knowledge of planning and working with people.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Medic

Also known as: Set Medic

What does a Medic do?

A Set Medic is responsible for any medical assistance needed on the production. They are placed on standby and must be ready in case there is any need for medical assistance from one of the cast or crew. Medics are typically on every set since the threat of an injury or medical issue is always present, and more medics may be present for dangerous scenes. They may also be required to advise the production of safety measures and medical knowledge to ensure everyone’s safety.

Sometimes Medics can become medical consultants. Being a medical consultant means you would advise the production crew on the medical accuracy of a scene. You would stand by to make sure all the medical aspects in a scene or story are correct.

What's a Medic good at?
  • Medical knowledge

    Have a very good understanding of medical knowledge and procedures

  • Medical certifications

    Have all the correct and current medical certifications to be a practicing medic

  • Physically fit

    Be able to move quickly and lift heavy objects if need be

  • Calm under pressure

    Be able to assist medical needs in, sometimes, dire circumstances

Who does a Medic work with?

A Medic will be hired by a producer of a film production that requires medical assistance on stand-by. They will receive the call sheets from the 1st Assistant Director. Medics work with anyone on set who requires medical attention or advice about medical safety.

How do I become a Medic?

A Medic on set has to be a registered paramedic. If you want to become a Set Medic, you must attend an institution to gain the education required to become a paramedic and then gain the experience necessary. Once that is completed, you will be able to offer your services for freelance on sets or work with an organization that will hire you out to various productions.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Greensperson

Also known as: Greensman

What does a Greensperson do?

The Greensperson is responsible for all the plants and live foliage on a film set. The Greensperson has to rent, arrange, and take care of all the plants for a film shoot. They sometimes have to create large jungles in a sound studio or decorate a room with the right plants for the scene. If the scene is outside, or a location doesn’t require the renting or creating of a green landscape, the Greensperson may be brought in to shape the existing plants to what is desired.

They are a part of the art department and have to do a lot of research in the pre-production stage. They have to mark all the areas in the script that require vegetation or plants, then they have to research the correct plants to acquire and where to acquire them. Once they get their budget they have to rent the plants to make the scene just right.

What's a Greensperson good at?
  • Knowledge of plants and vegetation

    Have an understanding or background in different types of plants and foliage

  • Green Thumb

    Know how to properly take care of a multitude of plants and vegetation

  • Physically fit

    Be able and willing to work long hours, inside and outside, moving heavy objects

  • Organization

    Be organized with the planning of what plants need to arrive on what day and time

Who does a Greensperson work with?

The Greensperson will typically work with the Production Designer and Set Decorator. The Greensperson will get the sketches from these team members of the look of the film. They work together to create the vision of the Director to life, the Greensperson focuses on the plant element in the sketches. They would also work with the production team, such as grips, on the day of shooting. The Grips or art department PAs would help the Greensperson get the plants into place.

How do I become a Greensperson?

There is no degree or education required but studying horticulture, botany, or design in landscaping would be good knowledge prior. Greensperson may begin working at a greenhouse and book themselves out to various film shoots to get established. Others may begin in the art department as a PA and then grow in set decorating and focus on the greenery aspects.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.

Reel Opportunities

Craft Service and Catering

Also known as: Crafty

What does a Crafty do?

Craft services, also known as crafty, is the department of film, TV, and video production which provides cast and crew with food, snacks, and drinks throughout the workday.

On smaller productions typically there is one main “craft table” where the snacks and coffee are set up – and that table remains stocked all day, every day. The craft area on these smaller productions may also be where you might go for other types of supplies, such as a first aid kit, bandages, aspirin, gum, antacids, toothpicks, hand sanitizer, sunscreen, and hand-warmers. On larger productions, craft trucks may be brought in to provide quick warm meals throughout the day like hot dogs or chili, along with other quick-grab items like prepackaged sandwiches or fruit.

Catering refers to complete hot meals, which are provided by a separate person or company to craft, usually a restaurant or catering company. On most larger productions “lunch” is generally catered, but can be any time of the day. This is usually pre-selected and ready at a specific time to keep the production on schedule.

What's a Crafty good at?
  • Scheduling

    Crafty must schedule food preparation to fit the shooting schedule of the production, as no one has time to wait for lunch

  • Food Handling skills

    Have the knowledge and the certifications to be able to handle food properly and safely

  • Customer Service

    Interacting with large groups of hungry people requires patience and a smile

  • Multi-tasking

    Often there are several different meals being prepped at the same time

Who does a Crafty work with?

Crafty and Catering work independently, but interact with all cast and crew on a set.

How do I become a Crafty?

There is no specific degree required for a craft services career, but an interest in food is an asset, as is a strong understanding of food safety. Catering companies are usually run by entrepreneurs with a background in Culinary school or in the food and hospitality industries. Gaining your food safety certification would be necessary to begin your career.

More tips

For more tips on finding job opportunities, lists of training programmes, and other great resources, check out our Career Resources page.

Our Partner, ScreenSkills UK is the industry-led skills body for the UK screen industries. For further information, www.screenskills.com.
Profiles and profile icons © 2022 ScreenSkills Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the copyright owner.
Job Profile Design by Dave Gray. Based on an original concept by Ian Murphy/Allan Burrell.